Author Archives: Susie

Newly Diagnosed With Osteoporosis or Osteopenia? Resources for Safer Exercise

Newly Diagnosed With Osteoporosis or Osteopenia? Resources for Safer Exercise

Many resist adapting their exercise when diagnosed with osteoporosis, but we never knows who is going to fracture or when. Many can live without fracturing. Taking the necessary precautions provides a better chance to be among those who don’t fracture! List of resources for safer movement with osteopenia and osteoporosis.Continue Reading

Overtraining: Get the Right Amount of Exercise to Prevent Osteoporosis

Overtraining: Get the Right Amount of Exercise to Prevent Osteoporosis

Overtraining? You mean we can get too much exercise? Yes! I often feel like a cheerleader for incorporating regular safe movement and exercise into your daily schedule to prevent fractures, osteoporosis and low bone density (osteopenia). Have fun with it! Move safely! Vary your routine! Make it social! Sometimes, however, I need to suggest thatContinue Reading

5 Traits of Centenarians, Staying Active, and Housework

5 Traits of Centenarians, Staying Active, and Housework

One of the four main traits that were common to the group was being active and staying mobile. They chose to do things in a more physical way, eschewing some modern conveniences. The range in mobility was huge, from a man who swam a mile in the Atlantic to a wheelchair bound woman who made a circuit in her mobile home, completing it 15 times a day. She felt that in order to keep moving, she had to make herself move to live.Continue Reading

Exercise Less and Accomplish More? Add Weight-Bearing Activities Throughout Your Day for Stronger Bones

Exercise Less and Accomplish More? Add Weight-Bearing Activities Throughout Your Day for Stronger Bones

Keeping a strong body with strong bones in the midst of a busy life can be a scheduling challenge! Awhile back, I switched from teaching my Safe Strength Training for Osteoporosis Prevention classes from three days a week to two days. My class participants and clients are generally between the age of 50 and 75. Many of us weren’t feeling fully recovered with only 48 hours between our hour-long, vigorous workouts. Read more about how 72 hours seemed to do the trick.

In a progressive resistance/strength training program, fully recovered muscles grow stronger after each workout. Those stronger skeletal muscles, all of which are attached to bone, then pull harder on your bones during movement, stimulating them to slow down bone loss and possibly even grow stronger.

Other research supports twice-weekly strength training as optimal for those in the over-fifty age group. That schedule provides plenty of time for other aerobic, heart-healthy types of activities. I love to see the recent research which helps us piece together the puzzle of what constitutes, “The Illusive Optimal Fitness Routine.”

Rest assured, many varied paths can lead to good, overall fitness.Continue Reading

Too Much Exercise Bad for Bones?

Too Much Exercise Bad for Bones?

Besides reminding our skeletons that they need to stay strong, exercise has profound effects on health.
Why one person has bone loss and another doesn’t is very individual.
Reasons can range from:
Genetics
Lifestyle
Diet
Bone development before age thirty
Adequate physical activity over a lifetime
Body chemistry
Stress levels
Excessive exercise
Unknown reasons
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Weighted Vests for Osteoporosis Prevention

Weighted Vests for Osteoporosis Prevention

Research on weighted vests has shown promising results for osteoporosis prevention. It’s another strength training tool to increase muscle strength which stimulates the development of bone strength. If you have health issues or bone loss, work with a physical therapist or other qualified health professional before using a weighted vest or belt to make sure that you can move safely while wearing it. Tips when wearing a weighted vest:

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Q & A: Weight training for osteoporosis, toned body after 60, “batwings”, and elliptical trainers.

Q & A: Weight training for osteoporosis, toned body after 60, “batwings”, and elliptical trainers.

Just how tight everything gets depends a lot on genetics, skin tone, and body composition (fat to lean body mass ratio). Yes! You can achieve a very, very strong, body. The point is to strengthen your muscles, building a nice solid base underneath your skin. It does make a visible difference. But, honestly? We need to work with what we can control, our exercise and healthy diet, and let go of the unrealistic expectation that gravity and years won’t have an effect on our skin. Our bodies work and they’re beautiful!
My advice? Go for health. Don’t be too hard on yourself, do your strength training regularly, read Younger Next Year for Women, and have fun being active!! ….and keep your arm muscles flexed when you wave! 🙂Continue Reading

Osteoporosis Exercise Guidelines and Motivating Resources for New Year’s Resolutions!

Osteoporosis Exercise Guidelines and Motivating Resources for New Year’s Resolutions!

Are you making your New Year’s Resolutions for Exercise? If you’re joining a class that isn’t specifically for those with bone loss, be sure to advocate for yourself. Let your instructor know the movements that you need to avoid of high impact, forward bending, and twisting to the point of strain, especially quickly. Keep excellent posture and frequently check your form in the mirror. Continue Reading

Keeping Fit with Osteoporosis

Keeping Fit with Osteoporosis

What do you do if you can’t do what you used to do to keep fit because of osteoporosis or other degenerative issues?” Number one, make the necessary adaptations to exercise safely!-video clip. How-to-stay-fit suggestions with safer ways of moving when you have osteoporosis or osteopenia.Continue Reading

Equipment Selection for Strength Training for Osteoporosis Prevention

Equipment Selection for Strength Training for Osteoporosis Prevention

Choosing the right equipment for strength training for osteoporosis and osteopenia prevention is important! Here are a few clips from my DVD on equipment selection….I like to see women over-fifty start with sets of one to five pound dumbbells because it’s safer to increase the intensity of strength training in one pound increments. You can purchase heavier weights as you get stronger….Ankle or Leg Weights: Whichever kind you choose, be sure to get the adjustable kind. If holding dumbbells is uncomfortable for your hands because of arthritis, you can either try using your ankle weights or get some adjustable wrist weights. Often, friends and relatives have unused strength training equipment, so ask around! You’ll also see dumbbells in second hand stores. You’ll get great use of this equipment to slow down bone loss. All of it should last a lifetime and more!Continue Reading